Last-minute Customization: The Theory of Postponement for Highly Variable Items

If a product has high variability and low importance you can manage it with inventory, but using Kanban or VMI to allow for a quick response to a spike in demand. For these items you could build subassemblies or stock them in adherence with the theory of postponement.

The Trouble with High Variability

The theory of postponement was developed at Hewlett Packard in Vancouver, Washington and simply means that you finish the customization of the product at the last possible moment. When HP was shipping printers to Europe each printer was the same, but required a user manual in a specific language and a power plug that met regional standards. HP would build printers for France and others for Germany, ship them off, and find that they always shipped the wrong number. The product was highly important for the company but highly variable.

Last-minute Customization

HP learned to customize the product at the last moment by shipping printers without user manuals or power cords. The manuals and cords were added at a facility in Europe, so HP could cut inventory – and the costs associated with holding it – while increasing customer service levels. Engineers or designers can come up with solutions to make manufacturing flexible, enabling you to work around high variability.

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